7 Quick Takes Friday (set #3)

Some random thoughts or bits of information are worthy of sharing but don’t warrant their own full post. This idea was started by Jennifer Fulwiler at Conversion Diary to address this blogging need. So, some Fridays I too participate when I have accumulated 7 worthy items. Without further ado:

— 1 —

Today is Pope Benedict’s 83rd birthday! He has been an outstanding shepherd during his 5 years in the Chair of Peter. Of late there has been much written in the so-called mainstream media attacking the Holy See. Do not believe a word of it. May His Holiness have many more birthdays.

— 2 —

I really want to stay away from Catholic news and opinion in this blog only because that is not what it is about. Still, from time to time things are so outrageous that I can not help myself from commenting (at least in Quick Takes Friday). Such is the case of Richard Dawkins, who has asked UN lawyers to have Pope Benedict arrested for crimes against humanity. Yup, that is how loony the extreme left is (making the New York Times look almost reasonable — well, not really). Watch this wonderful spoof:

— 3 —

Are you a Roman Catholic? That is a trick question. We are the Catholic Church, not the Roman Catholic Church. Folks outside of the Church often get this wrong and sometimes even us Catholics! There are several good discussions on the history of this such as How Did the Catholic Church Get Her Name? by Kenneth Whitehead.

— 4 —

In the realm of minor issues, there is one on which I just can not make up my mind. On Sunday I usually attend the 8:45am Mass. That is the one we were dismissed from while in RCIA. The music is often exceptional and moving, which occasionally leads to applause. The sticky part – is that appropriate? Part of me says no, not during Mass. It should be supportive of Mass and not the focus; Mass is not entertainment; if applause is acceptable, then how about booing; if applause is allowed, then are we showing disapproval when we don’t? On the other hand, I really, really appreciate our musicians and choir. We sometimes laugh or even applaud during the homily. I can see it both ways.

— 5 —

Along the same lines, we also follow the orans position – gesturing toward the priest with outstretched hands when responding “and also with you” and hold hands during the Our Father. I have read that this is not liturgically correct, strictly speaking. It is not explicitly allowed and innovations or novelties at Mass are not permitted. The USCCB and EWTN have articles on it. Yet, I like it and feel that it helps bind us together. Is concern with these kinds of things just being overly scrupulous?

— 6 —

Today’s quotes are:

Stupidity is also a gift of God, but one mustn’t misuse it.

Pope John Paul II

and…

Know yourself. Don’t accept your dog’s admiration as conclusive evidence that you are wonderful.

Ann Landers

— 7 —

Tax day has passed. Maybe someday we will find a sane way to do this.

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Comments

  1. I enjoyed your thoughts in take #4. I see it both ways, as well. It feels awkward not to clap in a room full of applause, yet as a church musician I can say that it completely changes the focus. When I sing in church, applause turns the music ("praying twice" — St. Augustine) into a performance and detracts from prayer. My gut says that applause is best left for concert halls, yet…
    Thanks for your thoughts on this!

  2. I agree with you as well on #4. And am pleased to hear what Maia said above. I have always wondered how the musicians feel about it. I think it would be less of a problem if churches were still built with choir lofts. Because the musicians are right up front, people feel compelled to show their appreciation in a manner best left for concerts because it feel like a concert. Minus 100 points for churches built like barns, brick tents and other shapes not well suited for worship.

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